New perspectives on the cultivation of our honeybee – Farming for the Landless

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Fresh Ideas to Forage

As this year’s honeybee foraging season approaches, a fresh bee book launches. On Sunday 1st March 2015, Farming for the Landless: New perspectives on the cultivation of our honeybee, Platin Press, will be presented for the first time by author Sarah Waring and ecologist Caroline Birchall (the Bee Collective and Buglife’s B-Lines) at Freightliners Farm, Islington, London.

“Devastating colony losses have resulted in rallying calls to ‘save our bees’. Media interest and a multitude of campaigns have rapidly raised public awareness. Concern for bees is now high but often fraught with popular myths.”

Farming-for-the-Landless-book-Cover

With so many facts, figures and comments about bees in circulation, it can be a challenge to appreciate their full significance. Farming for the Landless contextualises apiculture’s ecological and agricultural importance today. In this in-depth cultural study, current debate about pollination, forage, agricultural chemical use, parasites and viruses, breeding and rearing, queen and colony transportation, subspecies adaptation, and honeybee conservation are all presented in an accessible and engaging manner. Interviews with beekeepers, agricultural scientists and ecologists add first-hand accounts to analysis of recent events, historical precedents and future aspirations. Beekeeping across Europe is explored from the intensive agriculture of Romania to fallow post-war Kosovo, from remote sites in Slovenia and Sweden to the urban sprawl of Paris and London, from Austrian farmland to the largest agricultural region in Germany.

remote-beekeeping-sites-in-Slovenia

Remote Beekeeping Sites from Slovenia.

The book – Farming for the Landless asks: What might it mean to consider the conservation of a farmed creature?

“The honeybee, Apis mellifera, is a species on the cusp of culture and nature… If we’re to seriously improve honeybee health and with it our own wellbeing, we need to make the most of this timely opportunity to realise a more interconnected approach to agriculture and ecology.

This is a book for beekeepers, ecologists, scientists and nature enthusiasts, appealing to the non-farming landless community we have largely become.

sarah waringAbout the author

Sarah Waring lives and works in the UK and Italy. She studied Fine Art Photography at the Royal College of Art, lectured at the University of Westminster and University of the Arts and worked as a writer and media publishing editor in London… For more informations about the author and this book visit www.farmingforthelandless.com.

Source: www.farmingforthelandless.com

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