Research: Tiny technology on bees

0
Don't be shellfish, share...Share on Google+4Share on Facebook0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Tumblr0Share on StumbleUpon55Digg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page

Australian scientists will thousands of bees equipped with miniature chips to help them track their movement to try to figure out how diseases are spread in the northern hemisphere which massacred the entire population of these pollinators. Members of the Australian government science agency CSIRO said that microchips can help in the fight against the extinction of entire colonies of bees mysteriously disappear from hives, and to curb the spread of dangerous parasites.

Scientists will this microchips, large two and half square millimeter and a heavy five milligrams, fastened on bees with tweezers and adhesive after they are put to sleep in separate coolers.

Australian researchers calculate that they can verify how effective pesticides are to protect bees from infections and parasites. On other hand also farmers and fruit growers should get useful information on their movements by pollination of plants. “Bees play a vital role in agriculture,” said project leader at CSIRO Paulo de Souza. “With this technology, we can better understand their role in the environment.”

Experts will be among the Australian summer on the southern island of Tasmania equipped with microchips 5000 bees. Devices that emit radio signals, operating similarly to a toll cards: when bee with microchip will get closer to a specific sensor, it will be detected and stored all data. Scientists will also get a three-dimensional picture of the dynamics of these tremendously beneficial pollinators. In the future thay plan to make some minor chips, which could also equipped small insects, including mosquitoes, which could benefit the fight against diseases transmitted by this much more annoying and dangerous creatures.

Source: csironewsblog.com and czs.si

Don't be shellfish, share...Share on Google+4Share on Facebook0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Tumblr0Share on StumbleUpon55Digg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page

About Author

Frenkie

The beekeeper since year 2000, lover of nature, healthy diet and technology. I`m also editor of the beeTIME.eu.

Comments are closed.